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1
Routers / [Video] - Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3
« on: November 08, 2012, 07:12:13 am »
[Video] - Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/video-step-by-step-guide-to-install.html

Note: Steps by Steps video guide to install JunOS 10.1 in Qemu for GNS3 for Juniper router simulation can be viewed at the end of this post.

Download the required software
1. JunOS 10.X (use Torrents may OS Image are available from there i also got) Link
2. Download FreeBSD 4.11 as base OS for Router Download
3. Download Qemu 0.11.0 from GNS3 web site Download
4. Need to Software to create CD ISO image. ex: Deep Burner

Time to Start

Step 1: Download all the given files above
Step 2: Extract Qemu in a folder
Step 3: Open cmd and navigate to extracted folder
Step 4: Create a HDD image to install JunOS of 4GB

qemu-img.exe create j.img -f qcow2

Step 5: Start the Qemu with Free BSD CD and Created HDD

qemu.exe -L . -m 256 -hda j.img -boot d -localtime –cdrom ..\4.11.4.11-RELEASE-i386-miniinst.iso

Step 6:
Install Free BSD in Qemu
Skip Kernel configuration
Choose standard installation
With fdisk, press A to allocate entire disk for bsd
Select: install a standard MBR
Create partition (with C)
512M for /
1024M for swap partition
128M for /config
and the rest for /var
Choose installation type: user, and select No for FreeBSD ports
X to Exit the menu and install from CD/DVD
Wait until it's done
Yes for chance to set any last options
Type root password
Select 'X' to Exit the installation, it will reboot
while it's rebooting, exit from Qemu by pressing Ctrl-Alt-2,
then type: q

Step 7:
Make JunOS ready to transfer in guest OS
Create a CD Image (ISO) of junOS (using deepburner or any of it kind) and save in Qemu Folder with name like j8.iso
 
Step 8:
Make JunOS Ready for Installation

qemu -L . -m 512 -boot c -hda j.img –cdrom j8.iso

We need to untar the signed jinstall file first:

#mount /cdrom
#cd /var/tmp
#mkdir junos
#cd junos
#tar zxvf /cdrom/jinstall-10.1R1.8-domestic-olive.tgz
Then untar the unsigned image:
#mkdir jinst
#cd jinst
#tar zxvf ../jinstall10.1R1.8-domestic.tgz
Extract the pkgtools.tgz file and replace the checkpic binary inside with /usr/bin/true :
#mkdir pkgtools
#cd pkgtools
#tar zxvf ../pkgtools.tgz
#cd bin
#cp /usr/bin/true ./checkpic
#cd ..
Create tar for pkgtools then remove the directory:
#tar zcvf ../pkgtools.tgz *
#cd ..
#rm -rf pkgtools
Create tar for the new jinstall package with modified checkpic
#tar zcfv /var/tmp/j.tgz *
Then install the new jinstall with bsd pkg_add tool:
#pkg_add -f /var/tmp/j.tgz

It will ask to reboot to continue the installation.
One installation is finished and prompt is returned press Crtl+Alt+2 then type “q” press enter

Step 9:
Install JunOS in Guest VM

“qemu -L . -m 512 -hda j.img -serial telnet:127.0.0.1:1001,server,nowait,nodelay –localtime”

open new cmd and do telnet to 127.0.0.1 to enjoy the watching installtion process of JunOS
Once Prompt appear type cli to start junOS configuration.

2
Routers / Re: How To - Step By Step Installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 18, 2012, 01:29:42 am »
Testing:

To check if everything work, let’s configure 2 Olives:

root@%cli
root>edit
[edit]
root#

[edit]
root#set system root-authentication plain-text-password
New password:
Retype new password:

[edit]
root#set interfaces em0 unit 0 family inet address 10.0.0.1/8
[edit]
root#commit
commit complete

Configure the other device using the same commands but with another IP address (e.g. 10.0.0.2/8) and ping.
 
root#exit
Exiting configuration mode
root> ping 10.0.0.2
PING 10.0.0.2 (10.0.0.2): 56 data bytes

64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=9.771 ms
64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.614 ms
64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.693 ms
64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.630 ms

Additionally, configure OSPF (or any other multicast based protocol) to test if your routers can talk to each other using multicast packets. Again, type those commands on both routers:

root# set protocols ospf area 0 interface em0

[edit]
root# commit
commit complete

[edit]
root# exit
Exiting configuration mode
Then monitor the traffic from one of the router, you should see some multicast traffic (from/to 224.0.0.5):

root> monitor traffic interface em0

02:30:30.973748 Out IP 10.0.0.1 > 224.0.0.5: OSPFv2, Hello, length 48
02:30:31.007675  In IP 10.0.0.2 > 224.0.0.5: OSPFv2, Hello, length 48

Is everything working? yes? then you are successfully running JunOS! Happy networking

What is working:
Here is a list of what has been tested and works. You can extend this list by posting comments on what is working or not for you and I’ll update the list:
 
 OSPF (fxp0)                                  OK

 OSPF (em0)                                  OK


A few words about the patch:
By default using JunOS with a non-patched Qemu, multicast based protocols didn’t worked. As I have very little driver coding experience (and time to learn), I patched Qemu to allow multicast frames to be received by JunOS, instead of being filtered at the driver level multicast frames are filtered by JunOS. The only problem I see could be on the performance side, as JunOS receives every multicast frames, even those not destined to it. However, I think this is not an issue for a simulated lab environments and it worked just fine so far.
If you feel you can do something cleaner, please don’t hesitate, you can still read one of the Intel manuals concerning the e1000 to have an overview of how complicated driver programming can be


Conclusion:
If you are IT guy (hope you are if you want to play with JunOS), you should be able to run JunOS on your PC without too many issues. I wrote this howto to be as complete as possible, showing how to compile and patch Qemu on 3 different operating systems, installing FreeBSD and JunOS. I encourage everyone to contribute to it by providing fixes, comments or any other help.


Read More: http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of_7762.html

3
Routers / Re: How To - Step By Step Installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 18, 2012, 01:24:55 am »
Updating JunOS
You can update your version of JunOS from the CLI with the following command:
request system software add [jinstall_package]

Running your router(s)
Now you have a base olive image. Qemu allows you to use this as a base for other images and only writing the changes to your “slave” images saving on disk space! You can also use less memory for each Qemu instance.
Create a new image off of your base image. Repeat for all your routers you want to emulate:
 
qemu-img create -b olive-base.img -f qcow2 R1.img
 
Start your router and then telnet to it:
2001 Once logged in, you can type “cli” to launch the JunOS command line interpreter, exit to … exit and halt to shutdown FreeBSD. Remember to kill your qemu instance(s).

qemu R1.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2001,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:01:01,model=e1000 -net user telnet localhost

Networking your routersOk, one router it’s cool but useless alone. It’s time to make your virtual network! There are many
ways to network your olive routers.Olive to Olive using UNIX socketsUNIX sockets create a TCP stream between two Qemu instances with one a client and the other
a server. Apparently this method creates duplicate packets sometimes.
qemu R1.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2001,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,vlan=1,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:01:01,model=e1000 \
-net socket,vlan=1,listen=:6000
 
qemu R2.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2002,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,vlan=1,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:01:02,model=e1000 \
-net socket,vlan=1,connect=127.0.0.1:6000

Olive to Olive using UDP tunnels
UDP tunnels are mainly used to connect to Dynamips/GNS3 emulated routers but can also be
used as a more reliable way to connect two Qemu olives together but this can result in much
lower latency connections as well.Olive to real world using TAP interfaceOne way to connect an interface on your Olive with a real Ethernet NIC is to use a bridge
and the Qemu tap option.Linux:It is required that you have the generic TUN/TAP driver either built-in to your kernel, or available
as a module. To check the availability of this module do the following:
ls -la /dev/net/tun

if you get no such file or directory, try doing a modprobe tun. It should then appear in the
lsmod output.
One way to connect an interface on your Olive with a real Ethernet port is to use a bridge and
the net -tap option. This requires you to have the generic TUN/TAP driver either built-in to your
kernel, or available as a module. To check the availability of this module do the following:Let’s say you started the emulator with the following:
qemu R1.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2001,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,vlan=1,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:00:01,model=e1000 \
-net tap,vlan=1,script=no
Note the vlan=1 and -net tap options. This basically connects your Olive’s en0 to a virtual tap
interface (usually tap0) on your host system. Start up Qemu, and once the emulator is running,
proceed to the next step. You’ll need to start up the emulator as root, or change the ownership
or permissions on /dev/net/tun.We’re going to need to now bridge the tap0 interface to another Ethernet interface on the host
system. To do this, we’ll utilize the bridge capabilities of Linux. First, get the bridge utilities:
sudo apt-get install bridge-utils
Let’s assume you want to connect en0 on the Olive to eth1 on the host system.Do the following as root:
brctl addbr br0
brctl addif br0 eth1
brctl addif br0 tap0
This creates a bridge device, br0, and binds the two interfaces to it. Right now everything is still
down. Let’s bring it up…
ifconfig eth1 up
ifconfig tap0 up
ifconfig br0 up
Now the bridge and member interfaces should be up. Don’t assign any IP addresses to either of the
member interfaces. If you want to, you can assign something to br0 if needed. (br0 is analogous
an SVI in the Cisco world) To see the status of the bridge, do the following:
brctl show
bridge name     bridge id               STP enabled     interfaces
br0             8000.000cf19ce06c       no              eth1
                                                        tap0
Now, assign an IP address to the em0 interface on your Olive, and it should be online. You are
also free to tcpdump on the bridge or member interfaces, for debugging. All of this can probably
be put into a Qemu interface script, so you can remove the script=no option, and make it a little
more automatic.Your kernel might have ethernet filtering (ebtables, bridge-nf, arptables) enabled, and traffic gets
filtered except ARP and STP. The easiest way to disable this is to go to /proc/sys/net/bridge.
Check if the bridge-nf-* entries in there are set to 1; in that case, set them to zero and try again.
More information on bridges available here.# cd /proc/sys/net/bridge
# ls
bridge-nf-call-arptables  bridge-nf-call-iptables
bridge-nf-call-ip6tables  bridge-nf-filter-vlan-tagged
# for f in bridge-nf-*; do echo 0 > $f; doneWindows:Using OpenVPN you can create several tap interfaces with “Add a new TAP-Win32 virtual Ethernet adapter” and rename them with something like ‘Tap1′, ‘Tap2′ and so on Let’s say we have created 1
Tap interface and renamed it as Tap1. Right click this Tap1 interface on Windows Control Panel –
Network Connections and give IP address for example 10.1.1.1/8.Now you can start Qemu with the -net tap option and ping the interface from your Olive:

qemu -L . -m 96 -hda R1.img -localtime \
-net nic,vlan=1,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:01:01,model=e1000 \
-net tap,vlan=1,ifname=tap0
Mac OS XOn Mac OS X, download and install the TunTap package.
qemu R1.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2001,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,vlan=1,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:00:01,model=e1000 \
-net tap,vlan=1,ifname=tap0,script=no
We need to give this inter face an ip address:
sudo ifconfig tap0 198.18.0.250/24 up

Olive to real world using PCAP/LACPIn the patch provided in this howto, there is an option to use PCAP or LCAP libraries to bridge directly to a physical interface. You will probable need to run Qemu under Administrator privileges. Please also note that it will stop any other traffic on your interface.

For PCAP:
qemu R1.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2001,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:01:01,model=e1000 \
-net pcap,ifname=eth0

For LCAP:
qemu R1.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2001,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:01:01,model=e1000 \
-net lcap,ifname=eth0

Please note that you have to configure an IP address your physical interface before being able to communication between your routers. Also I didn’t test PCAP/LCAP on Windows.Olive to Dynamips or PemuThe lastest patch also added a udp option to allow networking to a Dynamips or pemu.

qemu R1.img -m 96 -nographic -daemonize -serial telnet::2001,server,nowait \
-localtime -net nic,vlan=1,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:00:01,model=e1000 \
-net udp,vlan=1,sport=10000,dport=10001,daddr=127.0.0.1
Then in your dynagen .net file[[router Cisco1]]
fa0/0=NIO_udp:10001:127.0.0.1:10000Olive to GNS3Under GNS3,

You can create a “Cloud” and configure a NIO UDP (you can add as many NIO UDP as you want). The “Cloud” will be your interface between Olive and GNS3, you can link a firewall or a router per NIO UDP.Of course, you can do the same with other NIOs like NIO TAP to connect to yourolive using a TAP interface

Read More: http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of_7172.html

4
Routers / Re: How To - Step By Step Installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 18, 2012, 01:21:23 am »
FreeBSD installation


Now that we have qemu installed, we can create the image for installing FreeBSD. Run this command to create it and allocate 4 GB:

qemu-img create -f qcow2 olive-base.img 4G

Launch Qemu to install FreeBSD on the image:

qemu -m 256 -hda olive-base.img -cdrom 4.11-RELEASE-i386-miniinst.iso \
-boot d -localtime

Qemu window will pop up (remember, by default press CTRL + ALT to release the cursor in Qemu):

Skip Kernel configuration:
Once Qemu has booted the FreeBSD installation image, you can select standard installation:

When you see the FDISK Partition Editor, press A to allocate the entire disk for FreeBSD and then Q to confirm:
Select “install a standard MBR” and when you see the FreeBSD Disklabel editor, press C to create the following partitions:

ad0s1a /               1024M
 ad0s1b swap            1024M
 ad0s1e /config         12M
 ad0s1f /var            rest
 
Choose “User” distribution type and answer no for the question “Would you like to install the FreeBSD ports collection?”. Exit the menu and install from a FreeBSD CD/DVD:

Wait until all the files are installed in your image:

Once the files are copied, the installer program will ask you many user confirmation questions (Ethernet/SLIP config, gateway, inetd, FTP, NFS, security, console, linux compatibility, set time, etc). Just answer no for each of them. You will also be asked to enter a root password, just do and remember it. Now you should see the starting menu of the FreeBSD installer, exit by choosing X Exit Install. While FreeBSD CD is rebooting, quit Qemu by by pressing Ctrl-Alt-2, then type: quit.

JunOS installation
Now it’s time to install JunOS our FreeBSD image. I used JunOS 8.5R1.14 but your are free to try other versions even if it is usually recommended to have a version less than 8.5. Boot the image and attach a Intel e1000 virtual network card to Qemu:

qemu -m 256 -hda olive-base.img -boot c -localtime \
-net nic,macaddr=00:aa:00:60:01:01,model=e1000 -net user

FreeBSD should start and after login with the root password, you are ready to enter commands:

Ensure you get an IP address and find out what is your default gateway IP address. Ping it just to be sure it’s working:

dhclient em0
netstat -r
ping 10.0.2.2

You can use FTP or SCP (or any other way you may think about) to download JunOS in FreeBSD. Here I chose to use SCP. On Mac OS X, don’t forget to activate “Remote login” in System Preferences -> Sharing.

scp user@10.0.2.2:~/Desktop/jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-signed.tgz /var/tmp

The jinstall file after 7.4 version has a binary called checkpic. This binary will fail and the image cannot be installed. Replacing this binary with /usr/bin/true fixes the issue. Also, it is needed to recalculate MD5 and SHA1 checksums before archiving them back. Finally, you can install JunOS with pkg_add.

cd /var/tmp
mkdir jinst-signed
cd jinst-signed
tar zxvf ../jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-signed.tgz
 
mkdir jinst
cd jinst
tar zxvf ../jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic.tgz
 
mkdir pkgtools
cd pkgtools
tar zxvf ../pkgtools.tgz
cd bin
cp /usr/bin/true ./checkpic
cd ..
 
tar zcvf ../pkgtools.tgz *
cd ..
rm -rf pkgtools
 
md5 -q  jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-signed.tgz >
jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-signed.tgz.md5
openssh sha1 jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-signed.tgz >
jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-signed.tgz.sha1
 
tar zcfv /var/tmp/jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-olive.tgz *
 
pkg_add -f /var/tmp/jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-olive.tgz

Once the jinstall package installed, you can stop FreeBSD by using the halt command and then Qemu by pressing Ctrl-Alt-2, then type: quit. The jinstall above really just installed a bootstrap environment so you need to boot up FreeBSD one more time to finish the installation (depending on your version). If you just restarted your guest above you will notice that you will get no output on your screen. This is because a real Juniper router has no VGA out and redirects everything to the serial port. No worries for us since QEMU will redirect the serial port to either stdio or a telnet port. To do so, launch Qemu with the stdio parameter:

qemu -m 256 -hda olive-base.img -boot c -localtime -nographic -serial stdio

On Mac OS X -nographic is not understand, so just ignore the Qemu window and look at your terminal.

Wait while the bootstrap process completes. The virtual olive will reboot itself automatically and nothing is needed. At the end of this process we will be sitting at a login prompt. Login as root and issue the halt command (CTRL + L if you do not see the prompt) and kill your Qemu proccess.

On Mac OS X, my terminal was kind of “broken”. To fix this, issue the reset command in your terminal.

Read More: http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of_21.html

5
Routers / How To - Step By Step Installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 18, 2012, 01:17:45 am »
Read More: http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of.html

I'll be posting all the steps you can ask you questions i'll be answering them, all these steps are tried and tested..

Installation

Requirements
•JunOS runs on top of FreeBSD. So you need to download the mini installation ISO, version >= 4.5 because earlier versions don’t support the Intel e1000 interface (em driver). Personally, I used the FreeBSD 4.11 mini-inst ISO but you could use FreeBSD 6 or 7.
 •JunOS itself. If you are smart and patient you will find it. I used jinstall-8.5R1.14-domestic-signed.tgz for my installations.
 •Qemu source code. Again, I used Qemu 0.11.0. You can choose to download it later with wget (I’ll show you how).
 •Download OpenVPN to create TAP interfaces (Windows only, optional).
 •More stuff whether you compile Qemu on Mac OS X, Windows or Linux.
 
Qemu compilation and patching on Mac OS X

The following procedure has been tested on Mac OS X Snow Leopard.

First you have to install the MacPorts and its dependencies (e.g. latest Apple’s Xcode Developer Tools).

Open a terminal window and install zlib, wget and libpcap via the MacPorts:


 

sudo port install zlib wget libpcap

Unzip qemu somewhere (e.g. in Documents/JunOS). Then from the qemu directory, patch and compile qemu:

Because FreeBSD hanged a few times when I was installing it inside Qemu, I applied a patch (qemu-0.11.0-macosx) which apparently fixed the problem (this is totally optional, maybe you won’t have any issue if not applied).


 

wget http://download.savannah.gnu.org/releases/qemu/qemu-0.11.0.tar.gz
tar xvzf qemu-0.11.0.tar.gz
cd qemu-0.11.0
wget http://downloads.sourceforge.net/gns-3/qemu-0.11.0-macosx.patch?download
patch -p1 -i qemu-0.11.0-macosx.patch
wget http://downloads.sourceforge.net/gns-3/qemu-0.11.0-olive.patch?download
patch -p1 -i qemu-0.11.0-olive.patch
./configure --disable-aio --disable-kvm --disable-kqemu --disable-sdl \
--target-list=i386-softmmu
make
sudo make install

Qemu compilation and patching on Windows

If you do not want to compile Qemu on Windows (I can understand that  I provide a static version that you can download here.

First some dependencies must be installed, I chose to almost compile everything:
•Download MinGW and install it (choose custom installation with g++ and make included). The file I downloaded was MinGW-5.1.6.exe
 •Download MSYS and install it, answer yes to post-installation questions and put the correct path to MinGW directory (should be C:\MinGW). The file I downloaded was MSYS-1.0.11.exe.
 •Download , zlib, SDL, MSYS coreutils into your MSYS home directory (e.g. c:\Msys\public\username). I downloaded zlib-1.2.3.tar.gz, SDL-1.2.14.tar.gz and coreutils-5.97-MSYS-1.0.11-snapshot.tar.bz2. MSYS coreutils is necessary because Qemu signrom.sh uses tools such as dd, od, expr, cp and printf which are included in coreutils.
 •Download and install  Winpcap Developer Pack: extract the contents of \lib and \include folders into \lib and \include folders of your MinGW installation location (should be C:\MinGW\lib and C:\MinGW\include)
 •Start MSYS.
 •Compile and install zlib:
 



cd
tar -xzvf zlib-1.2.3.tar.gz
cd zlib-1.2.3
./configure --prefix=/mingw
make
make install
•Compile and install SDL
 



tar -xzvf SDL-1.2.14.tar.gz
cd SDL-1.2.14
./configure --prefix=/mingw
make
make install
•Install coreutils
 



tar -xvjf coreutils-5.97-MSYS-1.0.11-snapshot.tar.bz2

Copy the content of coreutils-5.97-MSYS-1.0.11-snapshot in the MinGW directory (e.g. C:\MinGW). You can also compile and install wget in MSYS or simply use your preferred browser to download Qemu and the patch in the correct directories.


 

wget http://download.savannah.gnu.org/releases/qemu/qemu-0.11.0.tar.gz
tar -xvzf qemu-0.11.0.tar.gz
cd qemu-0.11.0
wget http://downloads.sourceforge.net/gns-3/qemu-0.11.0-olive.patch?download
patch -p1 -i qemu-0.11.0-olive.patch
./configure --target-list=i386-softmmu
make
make install

Qemu compilation and patching on Linux

Compiling Qemu on Linux (Ubuntu) is quite simple.

First install the dependencies: ncurses, zlib, libpcap-dev and SDL libraries. SDL is optional, you can still use Qemu in a console with the –ncurses option. Then apply the patch and compile Qemu.


 

sudo apt-get install libncurses5-dev zlib1g-dev libsdl-dev libpcap-dev
wget http://download.savannah.gnu.org/releases/qemu/qemu-0.11.0.tar.gz
tar xvzf qemu-0.11.0.tar.gz
cd qemu-0.11.0
wget http://downloads.sourceforge.net/gns-3/qemu-0.11.0-olive.patch?download
patch -p1 -i qemu-0.11.0-olive.patch
./configure --target-list=i386-softmmu
make
sudo make install

Qemu acceleration

Qemu provides some ways to speed up the emulation, I’ll talk about 2 of them: Kqemu and KVM. Kqemu can be used on both  Windows and Linux. KVM is only for Linux. I do not know if something exists for Mac OS X.

For more details about Kqemu, please have a look at the documentation. For KVM, see thewebsite.

The installation of Kqemu on Windows is relatively easy:
1.Download Kqemu.
 2.Unzip it.
 3.Locate kqemu.inf and install it (right-click and select Install). In Windows Vista, install Kqemu using the CMD prompt and this command: rundll32.exe setupapi,InstallHinfSection DefaultInstall 132 kqemu.inf
 4.Start Kqemu from the CMD prompt: net start kqemu
 
Kqemu on Linux (Ubuntu):
1.Install kqemu with: sudo apt-get install kqemu-source
 2.If you do not want to use sudo each time you start Qemu, give the permissions to /dev/qemu with the following command: sudo chmod o+rw /dev/kqemu
 
For manual installation or other Linux distributions, please see the documentation.

KVM on Linux:

Qemu requires your kernel version to be >= 2.6.29 to enable the KVM support. You have to ensure this is ok before you compile Qemu.

Don’t forget to add the -kernel-kqemu or -enable-kvm command line options when starting Qemu (I didn’t do it in this tutorial). I would recommend to activate Kqemu only when you have your Olive image ready and working.

6
Routers / JUNOS OLIVE 12.1R1.9 VMware/Qemu for GNS3
« on: October 01, 2012, 02:13:14 am »
First download JunOS Olive 12.1R1.9 and setup all requirement http://certcollection.org/forum/topic/150241-juniper-junos-olive-121r19-for-vmwareqemu/
Note: you can also download from some other link by searching on google if this link is found inactive


JUNOS OLIVE 12.1R1.9 VMware/Qemu for GNS3
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2012/09/junos-olive-121r19-vmwareqemu-for-gns3.html

7
Routers / Install Olive 12.1R1.9 With Qemu
« on: October 01, 2012, 02:07:13 am »
The article describes installation of Junos 12.1R1.9 on emulated x86 hardware. Hardware is emulated by Qemu and Junos installed on it is known as Olive. [Please let me know if you face any issue, all these steps are already tested]

How To Install Olive 12.1R1.9 With Qemu
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2012/09/how-to-install-olive-121r19-with-qemu.html


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I have just completed the installation of nsm20091r1 on RHEL(Redhat) 5 with the help of this tutorial, but there were also some additional steps done by me that are not mentioned in this tutorial. All the additional steps are also added in the tutorial below

http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2012/01/video-step-by-step-guide-to-install-nsm.html

9
Routers / Step By Step Install NSM 2009 on RHEL (Redhat) 5
« on: January 04, 2012, 08:00:39 am »

I have just completed the installation of nsm20091r1 on RHEL(Redhat) 5 with the help of this tutorial, but there were also some additional steps done by me that are not mentioned in this tutorial. All the additional steps are also added in the tutorial below


http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2012/01/video-step-by-step-guide-to-install-nsm.html

10
NSM / Step By Step Install NSM 2009 on RHEL (Redhat) 5
« on: January 04, 2012, 07:57:22 am »

I have just completed the installation of nsm20091r1 on RHEL(Redhat) 5 with the help of this tutorial, but there were also some additional steps done by me that are not mentioned in this tutorial. All the additional steps are also added in the tutorial below


http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2012/01/video-step-by-step-guide-to-install-nsm.html

11
Steps by Steps video guide to install JunOS 10.1 in Qemu for GNS3 for Juniper router simulation


http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/video-step-by-step-guide-to-install.html

12
Routers / [Video] - Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3
« on: December 14, 2011, 01:58:16 am »
Steps by Steps video guide to install JunOS 10.1 in Qemu for GNS3 for Juniper router simulation


http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/video-step-by-step-guide-to-install.html

13
Detail Guide for Installation of JunOS on GNS3 .. all the earlier issues are addressed and resolved..

Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3 [Part 1] [Updated]
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/step-by-step-guide-to-install-junos-on.html

Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3 [Part 2] [Updated]
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/freebsd-installation-now-that-we-have.html

Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3 [Part 3] [Updated]
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/step-by-step-guide-to-install-junos-on_10.html

14
Routers / Detailed Guilde To Install JunOS on GNS3 [Updated]
« on: December 11, 2011, 05:38:51 am »
Detail Guide for Installation of JunOS on GNS3 .. all the earlier issues are addressed and resolved..

Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3 [Part 1] [Updated]
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/step-by-step-guide-to-install-junos-on.html

Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3 [Part 2] [Updated]
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/freebsd-installation-now-that-we-have.html

Step By Step Guide To Install JunOS on GNS3 [Part 3] [Updated]
http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/12/step-by-step-guide-to-install-junos-on_10.html

15
 The sample configuration shown in the link below is of SSG 520, for any issues related to this post please let me know


http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/11/how-to-adding-netscreen-to-nsrp-cluster.html

16
I have posted a step by step sample configuration for NSRP cluster addition and interface monitoring, please let me know if you face any issue.

http://ahsantasneem.blogspot.com/2011/11/how-to-adding-netscreen-to-nsrp-cluster.html

17
STRM / Step by step installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 13, 2011, 01:19:54 am »
Just wanted to help .. I have finally done it .. let me know if you face any problem ..
http://ahstasusm.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of_1917.html

18
IDP / Step by step installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 13, 2011, 01:11:08 am »
Just wanted to help .. I have finally done it .. let me know if you face any problem ..
http://ahstasusm.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of_1917.html

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JunoSpace / Step by step installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 13, 2011, 01:04:36 am »
Just wanted to help .. I have finally done it .. let me know if you face any problem ..
http://ahstasusm.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of_1917.html

20
DX, WX, and WXC platforms / Step by step installation of JunOS on GNS3
« on: October 13, 2011, 01:00:04 am »
Just wanted to help .. I have finally done it .. let me know if you face any problem ..
http://ahstasusm.blogspot.com/2010/09/how-to-step-by-step-installation-of_1917.html

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